Finding the Thread That Ties Your Story Together: a Conversation with Pam Slim
Photo courtesy of C.C. Chapman.

Finding the Thread That Ties Your Story Together: a Conversation with Pam Slim

Written by Emilie

Topics: Work

Hi Multipotentialites!

I have a treat for you today. I recently sat down with author, blogger, coach, mom, MMA black belt holder, and all around sweetheart, Pam Slim.

Pam is the author of the new book, Body of Work: Finding the Thread That Ties Your Story Together. This book is a gift to multipotentialites. It’s highly highly relevant for us and frankly a total joy to read. She even mentions multipotentialites in the book and anyone who helps spread the word and give legitimacy to those of us who are wired this way is an angel in my books.

Here’s our conversation. I think you’ll really enjoy it:

Check out Body of Work and also be sure to take a look at Pam’s awesome blog, Escape from Cubical Nation.

Thanks Pam, for sitting down with me, sharing with and helping out the multipotentialite community and for being an amazing ally to our cause and multipotentialite yourself!

Your Turn

At the end of your life, what do you want your “body of work” to consist of?

5 Comments

  1. Lori Stalter says:

    This interview was so helpful! I loved the concept of the loathing scale. Especially since I hit a 10 for my job last September. You’re absolutely right about that being a time you’re more likely to burn bridges and make rash decistions. I know I wanted to. Fortunately, I didn’t and found a way to make peace with my situation while I play with side hustles. ;-)

    To answer Emilie’s question; I have figured out I like sharing knowledge I have with other people especially if that knowledge helps that person take action or discover new possibilities. So I definitely think my body of work will always include that in some way. But otherwise, I’m still slinging a lot of stuff against the wall to see what sticks.

    Great interview! Thank you both of you, Emilie and Pam.

  2. Zsolt says:

    Great questions Emilie and very helpful answers Pam! I don’t have kids, but I can see how most parents try to steer their kids instead of showing genuine interest and providing support so that they can figure it out for themselves. What we think sucks may be the greatest passion of our kids.

    I also love the loathing scale idea :) I quit my job two years ago, not without a plan, but without a plan B. My money ran out very soon after and I found myself in a rather difficult situation. So I totally agree, don’t quit out of a loathing attack. Only quit with a cool head. Easier said than done, right? :)

    • Emilie says:

      Definitely easier said than done. Maybe you need to hit 10 and then change your mindset a little to move back down the scale a and then quit. I’ve definitely seen this happen to people.

      Another thought. Perhaps being at 10 is a poor time to quit, but could be a fantastic time to start a side hustle.

      Thanks for your thoughts, Zsolt.

  3. Missy Cooke says:

    Excellent interview! Pam, I love how you mentioned that you try to find out what it is that your son likes about his potential career choices. This is something I try to do with my kids, and also helps me feel more connected to the choices I make for myself.

    I was also relieved to hear you say that you go through periods of self-doubt too. It’s nice to know even the ‘big dogs’ deal with that ;).

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