Trust Your Intuition, Always
Photo courtesy of "the camera is a toy".

Trust Your Intuition, Always

Written by Emilie

Topics: Traveling

Today was one of the worst days of my trip. This may seem like a far cry from my last post, but it actually isn’t, since they’re both about listening to yourself.

Here’s the thing about chance meetings: when opportunity presents itself, you must use your intuition. As my friend, Ev’Yan puts it, your intuition is your “inherent super power.” Use it.

When you have a funny feeling about someone, like they might not be 100% reliable, and this person happens to be responsible for your transportation, skip the landmark.

Even the magnificent cliffs of Big Sur weren’t worth feeling uncomfortable all afternoon. And they certainly weren’t worth getting stranded on the side of Highway 1 after the engine died.

Usually I’m very good at listening to myself, but sometimes there’s a lot of external pressure, both in the form of the “shoulds” from everyone who had told you that you MUST hit Big Sur, no matter what, and just from those around you. After all, you don’t want to look like a snob, or like you think you’re “too good” to be riding in a car that smells like pit bull (or was it armpit?) and looks like it’s about to fall apart…

Because sometimes the car is about to fall apart!

By all means, push yourself to try new things. But if you have a queasy feeling inside (and especially if safety is at issue), don’t feel bad about just skipping it.

Thankfully I’m fine and I made it home in one piece. I’m only glad that this was all it took for me to (re-)learn my lesson, because things could have been a LOT worse.

I do want to get the hell out of Monterey though!

Your Turn

Did you ever ignore your intuition and seriously regret it later?

24 Comments

  1. Trever Clark says:

    Good thing you didn’t come to visit Michigan. You probably would have written this post about my vehicle!

    • Emilie says:

      Haha yeah but it wouldn’t be a big deal, because I wouldn’t have felt like I betrayed myself. In other words, you don’t set off my sketchdar, Trever. :)

  2. Dan says:

    I had a similar experience once in China. I missed the bus that would have taken me to the Shaolin Temple, so I got a taxi instead. I sensed from the start that the driver wasn’t legit, but I went along with it as I really wanted to see the temple. Long story short, he and his Shaolin monk accomplice tried to rip me off and it totally soured the whole experience.

    Always a valuable lesson learned from these experiences though. Even monks can be con-men!

  3. Ev`Yan says:

    Yikes. This sounds like an ordeal. Can’t wait to hear about it in person, but in the meantime, don’t beat yourself up about it, Em. Sometimes we have to blatantly ignore our gut feelings because that’s how we learn exactly what they’re trying to tell us.

    I think the best way to get acquainted with your intuition is by knowing without a doubt when it’s speaking to you. And this can only be cultivated when we’ve made the habit of dismissing it several times.

    Now you know. :]

    xx.

    • Emilie says:

      Thanks Ev’Yan. “Don’t beat yourself up” was exactly what I needed to hear.

      And you make a very good point. It’s sometimes hard to know when your intuition is speaking and when it’s fear talking. Not so much in this context, but say if you’re about to embark on a new project or push yourself outside your comfort zone. That’s when “listening to yourself” can get confusing.

      Miss you. xo.

  4. Kirsten says:

    While you’re stuck in Monterrey, take the opportunity to visit the aquarium. It’s truly amazing. :)

    I had an experience that ensured I would always listen to my intuition – when I interviewed my ex roommate, her b.o. was overpowering, but she had good references and I couldn’t think of a nice way to say “No, I don’t want to live with you, you smell.’ Turned out she smelled because she never bathed, didn’t use toilet paper and didn’t ever clean up after herself. The year was a nightmare, and we almost went to court over the damages she did to the room she rented.

    • Emilie says:

      Oh I already did that! It was wondrous.

      That’s brutal, Kirsten. With roommates you have to really really be careful. Living with people is hard enough as it is. A bad roommate is the WORST. Much better to offend, and it’s funny too cause chances are you never would have seen her again.

      Ah well. You live, you learn.

  5. simone says:

    Well, I found myself thinking “hmm, I don’t really know about my own intuition.” Except, er, I was forgetting the most obvious things.

    When I met this guy, literally within two seconds, I knew that he was it. Something in me felt like we’ve known each other from past lives. Just three days later, I was telling all my friends that I found THE love of my life. All my friends thought, “oh, that crazy Simone.” Well, that was five years ago and we’ve been married for a year and a half and I’m more in love with him than ever!

    It’s so intriguing to think that intuition is a superpower that gets weakened because we ignore it and don’t use it.. I’m going to pay attention to mine much more!

  6. Ignoring my intuition has bit me in the @$$ so many times. Just recently I quoted a design project with a particular programmer in mind, yet part of me said, “Don’t do it! He’s going to get busy and then you’ll be screwed” because he’s the lowest bidder. Well, my intuition was right! Lesson learned (again). :)

    • Emilie says:

      Ahhhh yup. I hear you! I’ve had a few web design clients I took on against my better judgment and later regretted it. Totally.

  7. Amen girl! You rocked it again!

    I’ve practiced listening to myself intensely for many years, and learned some very hard lessons along the way. I’m glad you took value from your experience, and I’m confident your trip is looking more and more up.

    You’ve got a great attitude!

    This is timely, because I just finished reading an awesome post from Nathalie Lussier (http://nathalielussier.com/ – Online Business Triple Threat) about Walking Out (as opposed to showing up).

    As a kid I was insanely popular, friend to all because I’m a creative fountain of value, and I set no boundaries on what people could take from me.

    Hey, free goldmine, why not? ;)

    Anyway, as this went on, my heart and intuition were telling me more and more, “Jay, you’re on a very powerful path to success, your main gift is positivity and success-focus, it’s important you connect and relate with like-minded people.”

    I used to stay in discussions and relationships that did not suit me, ones which were peppered with resistance and negative beliefs.

    I rationalized it because I know I am faithful, love humanity, and believe in others success, so I’d just stay in those situations, convinced my unending energy, vision, and positivity would uplift them.

    Sometimes it did, but it was always a struggle.

    I don’t recommend it.

    I trust my intuition brilliantly. In an instant, I will follow it. I’ve been homeless ’cause my intuition told me to. I’ve been jailed, basically for no reason, because it told me to. I’ve walked out on Presidents + CEOs because it told me to.

    I’ve learned what values, qualities, and principles suit me, in fact, I’ve dedicated my life to the study of many of them, so as to share them expertly with anyone who’s ready for them.

    That being said, there’s always room for improvement, and I’m psyched to grow mine. That may mean some more ‘awkward moments’, but I’m good with it :D

    Anyway, everybody has intuition, it’s often been unpracticed, and it is one of the most amazing things to master and refine. Do it. Try it.

    I always love this quote from Richard Branson:

    “I normally make up my mind about whether I can trust somebody within 60 seconds of meeting them.”

    Woo, a ramble, but… fun :D Rock on, great topic.

    • Emilie says:

      Thanks for sharing, Jason. :)

      I find your story so interesting. Do you ever worry that you’re not pushing yourself enough though or giving something/someone enough of a chance? Do you ever have doubts?

      • Thanks! I always intend my stories to help, uplift, and provide value :D

        I think that the world is filled with worriers and doubters, (not by my choice ;), and that those worriers & doubters would really love to feel validated by and connected to me through Our Mutual Worry and Our Mutual Doubt, but honestly… not really.

        I mean, again, I’m not superman or some perfectionist-master, or whatever, but I feel like I’ve purified myself, my soul, my mind, and my heart pretty strongly in that area.

        Like most people, whatever you were horrible at and wounded with in youth, you shine in during adulthood.

        The world is filled with neurotics turned counsellors, shunned cripples turned shining inspirations, and thugs-turned-ballers.

        My childhood was one of continual doubt and second-guessing, and now I’ve got confidence beyond confidence, and I’ve done things in a year most people do in decades, and I only see it growing.

        If someone wants to press me, yeah, sure, I have occasional doubts, what human doesn’t? Even Jesus did :D

        I mainly focus on my strengths though, all said and done :)
        I highly recommend it :D

        Again, phenomenal post, and one I feel the community can really benefit from.

        (I posted something decision-making and fence-sitting about 5 minutes ago, which now that I think about it, seems related.)

  8. Glad to hear the experience worked out OK! Near-disasters are often good lessons. I think I learn from them not to get too excited about minor crises–I know I can cope. If I play it safe and don’t stretch, I don’t get to learn about my own capabilities. Then again, there’s no point in being a damn fool. As for intuition, it’s not 100% reliable. If I can do it safely, it’s often very educational to give people a second chance. Surprises ensue, often pleasant.

    • Emilie says:

      You’re right, sometimes intuition can be a little hazy. Sometimes it’s based on fear or preconceived notions and we should push ourselves a little. I think it’s important to listen to, but also question to a degree.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts Ann. Nice to hear from you!

  9. Harmony says:

    This reminds me of something that happened to me 2 years ago. I had met some 60-year-old Casanova through a good mutual friend. He helped me when I moved into my new flat. He was nice and a bit funny but because I knew he had 2 daughters around my age (and the mutual friend had told me he was just a lonely quirky old man, nothing to be worried about)I thought he wouldn´t hit on me. Long story short: he did and also told people that I was some kind of slut who only wanted to play with him (and they believed him!)

    I think it´s sometimes hard to listen to your intuition when it comes to meet new people because you don´t want to look uptight. There is some kind of pressure from the society about being open-minded that lead us to ignore that strange feeling that screams “Run away!”.

    On the other hand, I have a misleading intuition when it comes to men: 3 times, I thought I had find a potential boyfriend. I was wrong every time :-/ But I´ve met someone great 3 months ago. I can´t remember feeling anything special when we met: I guess it was a good sign :-)

    • Emilie says:

      Ugh, that’s horrible! I’m sorry you had to go through that. Creepy old men are ICK.

      I think you’re right, intuition is quite difficult to pinpoint when it comes to meeting new people (and especially in the area of relationships). There are so many other factors at force… But I think that if we pay attention and give the person a bit of time, usually those signs start to come through. The “writing on the wall,” if you will, is usually there.

      Thanks Harmony. :)

  10. Janet says:

    Nice re-lesson Em! Came at just the right time as I’m trying to adjust to my intuition as well… In my case, unreliable ‘clients’ ;)

  11. Ian says:

    Intuition is definitely alive and well. I always get an impression about my future clients and it has never been wrong in 25 years. Once or twice I ignored it (because I needed the work!) and yup, they did turn out to be troublesome.

    These days I have a really simple system. Make em wait. I have found that people who are prepared to wait a little while for their project to be done properly are brilliant and appreciative clients.

    Whereas, those who want you to drop everything, come tomorrow AND be the lowest bidder, really are just not worth the hassle unless you are starving!

    Oh, well Emilie, ups and downs eh!
    Stay well
    Ian

  12. Harrison says:

    I’ve heard from my California friends that the Highway 1 portion near Big Sur/Monterery is dangerous, so you aren’t far off from feeling that way!

    Your post also made me think of my recent tapping into my intuition. I recently decided to rebrand a couple of my blogs. I felt like the direction wasn’t what I intended it to be, but I’ve laid out a better path. Of course, it will evolve as my interests do too, but I now trust my intuition that I’ve got the “core” theme down.

    I’ll learn how to harness my “changeable” interests, just like you have :)

  13. jennifer says:

    Great post! You recently taught my via our Skype chat and chats via Twitter to trust my intuition. I’d been toying with letting go of the blog I’ve been running for almost 4 years now because it was making me feel uninspired and wasn’t allowing me the freedom I need as a multipotentialite. Of course I was fighting that feeling tooth and nail though because I didn’t want to give up all I’ve worked for. Talking to you helped me realize I need to trust my intuition and believe that I can make my new blog even better than my old one! I now truly believe that and can even visualize making it happen. I couldn’t do that before. Thanks!

  14. Raiscara Avalon says:

    Lol I lived in Monterey for over a year, and the only really cool thing about Big Sur to me was the eucalyptus trees. Cliffs don’t interest me, I grew up with them lol…except maybe those Dover ones, those look awesome. :)

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